Tag Archives: The Beatles

NEW MUSIC FRIDAY: Releases For The Week of May 26, 2017

Cruisin’ into chart waters.

Have a very musical Memorial Day Weekend with these top releases, including a lot of great new singles, remixes and acoustic takes. Let’s serve up all the action from this week’s schedule:

LIL YACHTY – Teenage Emotions (iTunes)
Next week’s top debut should come from this 19-year-old Georgia rapper, who has a nice online following and big streaming stats. A single from this set, “Peak A Boo”, featuring labelmates Migos, is in the lower rungs of both the Rhythmic and Urban radio surveys. Stream and track-equivalent units will be notable for this one, but will they be enough to carry the album to #1? Stay tuned.

More albums out this week: Bryson Tiller‘s True To Self (iTunes), Gucci Mane‘s Droptopwop (iTunes), James Vincent McMorrow‘s True Care (iTunes), Josh Baldwin‘s The War Is Over (iTunes), Shakira‘s El Dorado (iTunes), The Beatles‘s Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band (Deluxe Edition) (iTunes)

More EPs out this week: Axwell ^ Ingrosso‘s More Than You Know (iTunes), Kyle Lionhart‘s Eleven & Two (iTunes), Mabel‘s Bedroom (iTunes), River Matthews‘s Sunshine (iTunes), Serena Ryder‘s Electric Love (iTunes)

New digital-only singles that you can buy this week include:
“All I Can Do”, Bad Royale featuring Silver (iTunes)
“Another Week”, Eric Saade (iTunes)
“Break A Little (Hector Fonseca & Eduardo Lujan Remix)”, Kirstin (iTunes)
“Cali God”, Grace Mitchell (iTunes)
“Call Me”, NEIKED featuring MIMI (iTunes)
“Can I Be Him (Live Acoustic Version)”, James Arthur (iTunes)
“Cannonball”, ZZ Ward featuring Fantastic Negrito (iTunes)
“Cover My Own”, Old Sea Brigade (iTunes)
“Cringe (Stripped Version)”, Matt Maeson (iTunes)
“Cut To The Feeling”, Carly Rae Jepsen (iTunes)
“Dive”, Coast Modern (iTunes)
“Every Little Thing”, Deepend featuring Deb’s Daughter (iTunes)
“Feel It Still (Flatbush Zombies Remix)”, Portugal. The Man (iTunes)
“Fight For You”, Pluto featuring MAX (iTunes)
“Find Yourself”, Great Good Fine OK & Before You Exit (iTunes)
“FUNGSHWAY”, BIA (iTunes)
“Good Way”, Mark Elliott (iTunes)
“Gravity (White Sands Remix)”, Leo Stannard featuring Frances (iTunes)
“Heebiejeebies”, Aminé featuring Kehlani (iTunes)
“High Without Your Love (Acoustic)”, Loote (iTunes)
“Hit The Ceiling”, LION BABE (iTunes)
“I Know A Place (Brian Robert Jones Remix)”, MUNA (iTunes)
“I Miss Those Days”, Bleachers (iTunes)
“I Was Born”, Hanson (iTunes)
“I’m A Dreamer”, Violet Days (iTunes)
“I’m A Fan”, Pia Mia featuring Jeremih (iTunes)
“Liar”, Frans (iTunes)
“Lost In Your Love”, Colyer (iTunes)
“Loved By You”, Mali Music featuring Jazmine Sullivan (iTunes)
“Middle Fingers (Glades Remix)”, MISSIO (iTunes)
“Middle Of The Night (Felon Remix)”, The Vamps featuring Martin Jensen (iTunes)
“Need You”, Allie X featuring Valley Girl (iTunes)
“No Vacancy (French Version)”, OneRepublic featuring Amir (iTunes)
“Power”, Little Mix featuring Stormzy (iTunes)
“Remember I Told You”, Nick Jonas featuring Anne-Marie and Mike Posner (iTunes)
“Rooftops (Aber)”, Tobtok featuring Sorana (iTunes)
“Shame”, KNGDAVD (iTunes)
“Stay With You”, Cheat Codes featuring CADE (iTunes)
“Strangers”, Halsey featuring Lauren Jauregui (iTunes)
“Sure Thing”, Klyne (iTunes)
“Symphony (Cash Cash Remix)”, Clean Bandit featuring Zara Larsson (iTunes)
“The Youth”, George Taylor (iTunes)
“There For You”, Martin Garrix & Troye Sivan (iTunes)
“To Be Human”, Sia featuring Labrinth (iTunes)
“Treat Me”, Kiah Victoria (iTunes)
“Undercover (Coucheron Remix)”, Kehlani (iTunes)
“Ultra Love”, Marlon Roudette (iTunes)
“Wearing Nothing”, Dagny (iTunes)
“Woman”, Emmit Fenn (iTunes)
“Your Song”, Rita Ora (iTunes)

We’ll see you next week for new albums from BleachersHalsey and more. Listen to the PGTC Friday Faves list on Spotify!

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Be Good Johnny: The “Doe” Re Mi Of Chart Ditties

From dusk 'til "John".

From dusk ’til “John”.

The latest single from B.o.B is a collaboration with Priscilla on a song called “John Doe”. For the North Carolina rapper, it’s his sixth top 40 hit on the CHR chart as a main credit act, while it becomes the second for the singer who once charted as Priscilla Renea. (You may remember her minor 2009 entry called “Dollhouse”.) Sometimes, it’s all in the name, and in this case, a first name that’s been used in a lot of other hit singles throughout the decades. Considering that it was the 75th most popular name for boys last year, there’s quite a few more of them in the world.

So, with all the “John” song titles out there, I’ve limited it to just those that hit the top ten. After all, we can only hope that “John Doe” rises to the same region this summer. There’s some classic tunes among the handful of titles, plus a few fluffy numbers that are just so sugary sweet. Get ready to take attendance, because the pop pupils are all here:

Chuck Berry, “Johnny B. Goode” (#8, 1958)
He’s an icon and a pioneer of early rock ‘n’ roll music in the 1950’s. Released during the summer of 1958, “Goode” peaked just a few weeks before Billboard introduced its Hot 100 chart and climbed to #8 on what was then known as the Top 100.

Jimmy Dean, “Big Bad John” (#1, 1961)
Before breaking into the Breakfast business, Dean was a Country singer, and his biggest single topped that chart along with the Hot 100. After a string of hits in the 60’s, he would last break the Hot 100 in 1975. Dean passed away in 2010 at age 81.

Shelley Fabares, “Johnny Angel” (#1, 1962)
Known for her role on The Donna Reed Show, Fabares went from actress to singer and scored a #1 hit with her debut chart single. She managed another moderate hit for Colpix Records, a followup called “Johnny Loves Me”, which peaked at #21.

Joanie Sommers, “Johnny Get Angry” (#7, 1962)
The singer from Buffalo, NY broke into Billboard’s top ten in 1962 with what’s considered one of the more unusual songs in her catalogue of jazz and standards. It was her only top 40 single, and by the 1970’s, she began to pursue commercial work.

The Beach Boys, “Sloop John B” (#3, 1966)
Now, this “John” obviously isn’t a person; it refers to a sail boat of sorts, and it cruised through the chart waters to the high tides of the top 5. The origins of the song date back to the 1920’s. “Sloop” has been covered by several acts since it charted.

Dion, “Abraham, Martin and John” (#4, 1968)
After a string of flops, the former teen idol turned to religion, got clean, and recorded the original version of this tribute to four important American figures. It was a much-needed comeback, becoming his biggest song in five years and going Gold.

In 1971, a medley of this song along with “What The World Needs Now Is Love” went to #8 in a unique composition by disc jockey Tom Clay. It also featured interviews and clips from political figures of the time.

The Beatles, “The Ballad Of John and Yoko” (#8, 1969)
As “Get Back” topped the Hot 100 for five weeks, this tune was released as a followup to it, spending three straight weeks at #8 in July. Some radio stations at the time objected to playing the song due to religious issues. Of course, it’s all fine today.

El DeBarge, “Who’s Johnny?” (#3, 1986)
After leaving his family group at the end of their most successful era, he scored as a solo act in 1986 with a single from the film Short Circuit. Neither of the two followups from a self-titled album out later that year on Gordy Records went top 40.

For more games with names and titles with titles, follow the blog below or find PGTC on social media by clicking the “Get Social!” tab.

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TURN IT UP TUESDAY: What’s New In Stores This Week (January 21)

Gram bam, thank you, ma'am.

And the winner is…

In the middle of GRAMMY Week on the blog, let’s take a breather to see what’s new in stores this week. After all, the schedule goes on. Here are all the releases you need to know about for January 21:

  • This one is perhaps a little obvious, but the 2014 GRAMMY Nominees compilation is out today. It features top hits from Bruno Mars, Justin Timberlake, Katy Perry and more, who could all be big winners come Sunday night. Look for it to debut somewhere in the top 5, if not top ten. (iTunes)
  • Here’s a fabulous collection for the Fab Four fan (say that three times fast.) The Beatles release The U.S. Albums collection, featuring all 13 of their Stateside-issued LPs with their original artwork, tracklistings and edits on top of remastered sound quality and more. All 13 are also being rereleased individually. With a hefty price tag, it may not debut the highest, but it sure is a treat. (iTunes)
  • I just reviewed their album last week; now, duo A Great Big World are out with Is There Anybody Out There?, their debut release for Epic Records. It features their hit duet with Christina Aguilera, “Say Something”. Given their newfound coverage, it could surprise on the charts. For now, I’ll say a top ten debut with potential to go higher. (iTunes)
  • Indie rockers Young The Giant are out with their second album, Mind Over Matter, their first since 2010. Lead single “It’s About Time” is currently top ten on Alternative radio. (iTunes)
  • Other albums out this week include Aer‘s Aer (iTunes), Against Me!‘s Transgender Dysphoria Blues (iTunes), Graham Colton‘s Lonely Ones (iTunes), Los Lonely Boys‘s Revelation (iTunes), Mogwai‘s Rave Tapes (iTunes), Scorpions‘s MTV Unplugged (iTunes) and Ty Dolla $ign‘s Beach House (EP). (iTunes)

New digital-only singles that you can buy this week include:

  • “All The Way”, a fresh track from the duo Timeflies. (iTunes)
  • “Blue Moon”, a new single from rocker Beck. (iTunes)
  • “Free/Into The Mystic”, a live medley from Zac Brown Band and Clare Bowen from Nashville. (iTunes)
  • “How I Feel (Remixes)”, a new six-song package from rapper Flo Rida. (iTunes)
  • “Me And Liza”, the latest single from singer-songwriter Rufus Wainwright. (iTunes)
  • “Walking On Air”, from former *NSYNC member Lance Bass along with Anise K and featuring Bella Blue and Snoop Dogg. (iTunes)
  • “Who We Are (Remixes)”, a three-song EP featuring the Alternative hit by Switchfoot. (iTunes)

Next week, we’ll see those classic post-GRAMMY sales swings, plus new albums from Casting Crowns, David Crosby and more. See you in seven!

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TURN IT UP MONDAY: What’s New In Stores This Week (November 11)

Treat her like a Lady.

Treat her like a Lady.

Turn it up… Monday? Yes, once again this year, there’s a big Q4 release (art)popping into stores today, so, many albums and singles are out early. (NOTE: some releases may still not be out until Tuesday dependent on record label availability/iTunes response time.) Here’s what you need to know about on the schedule for the week of November 11:

  • Give her that thing she loves — album sales, of course, and maybe a little “Applause”. Lady Gaga‘s third studio album is ARTPOP, featuring current single “Do What U Want”, a collaboration with R. Kelly. Look for it to debut in the top 2, with Eminem‘s second week for The Marshall Mathers LP 2 determining whether the Lady makes it to the top or not. (iTunes)
  • Country hitmakers Lady Antebellum rerelease their album Golden in a deluxe edition, which features current radio hit “Compass”. The original disc went to #1 on the Billboard 200 in May. (iTunes)
  • Calling all Fab Four fans: straight from the vaults, over 60 previously unreleased session tracks from The Beatles will be available on On Air – Live At The BBC Volume 2, a series of songs recorded in 1963 and 1964. (iTunes)
  • Two greatest hits compilations reach the public this week, both by bands I particularly like: Keane has The Best Of Keane (iTunes), led by single “Higher Than The Sun”, and The Killers go with Direct Hits (iTunes), featuring the Alternative single “Shot At The Night”.
  • Christmas is in the air once again with several releases out this week, including Erasure‘s Snow Globe (iTunes), Jewel‘s Let It Snow (iTunes) and Tamar Braxton‘s Winter Loversland (iTunes).
  • Other albums out this week include Kellie Pickler‘s The Woman I Am (iTunes), Passenger‘s iTunes Session EP (iTunes), the soundtrack to the film 12 Years A Slave (iTunes) and two NOW! That’s What I Call… compilations: Music, Volume 48 (iTunes) and Disney, Volume 2 (iTunes).

New digital-only singles that you can buy this week include:

  • “All Bad”, the latest Music Mondays release from Justin Bieber. (iTunes)
  • “Banga Banga”, a new single from teen singer Austin Mahone. (iTunes)
  • “So Blue”, new from everybody’s favorite screeching cat, singer Akon. (iTunes)
  • “The Art Of Letting Go”, the second single from Mariah Carey‘s album of the same name. (iTunes; 11AM Monday.)

Next week, a few American Idol contestants are in the mix — a new album from Daughtry, plus a live EP from Phillip Phillips. How will they do against the legend herself, Barbra Streisand? A preview is coming next week!

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It’s My “Birthday” (And I’ll Post If I Want To): A Chart Story

You would blog too if it happened to you.

It only happens once a year, so, let’s celebrate! Today, I turn 23, and I have no clue what’s in store for my birthday. What I do know is that there have been a few “birthday” song titles to hit the charts, and I guess I have to do what I do best. I present to you a post chock full of the top “birthday” songs straight from Billboard Magazine, who, again, forgot to send me a cake. Not even a card? Maybe next year.

We start off our list with a one-hit wonder act from my home state of Massachusetts. From the town of Woburn came The Tune Weavers, a quintet who scored with “Happy, Happy Birthday Baby”. Though it pre-dated the Hot 100 by a year, it managed to get to #5 on Billboard’s similarly formatted Top 100 chart. The group broke up several years later. A version by Ronnie Milsap became a #1 hit on the Country chart in 1986.

In the late 50’s and early 60’s, singer Neil Sedaka was a hot streak with seven top-40 hits, three of them hitting the top ten. The eighth of the former and the fourth of the latter came in January 1962, when “Happy Birthday, Sweet Sixteen” rose as high as #6. Sedaka would eventually find three #1 singles on the Hot 100 as a performer. In June of that same year, singer and actor Johnny Crawford peaked at #8 with “Cindy’s Birthday”. It was his sole top ten single, though he made the top 40 with a handful of other songs.

The last “birthday” hit of the decade was released in 1969 by the Wisconsin-based band Underground Sunshine. “Birthday” was a cover of the popular song by The Beatles, which never saw the light of day as a single, though it did get a promotional release for jukebox play. The remake went to #26 on the Hot 100 and the band never charted in the top 40 again. In fact, there weren’t many birthdays being celebrated period on the charts for another twenty years.

The song that finally broke the dry spell was Johnny Kemp‘s “Birthday Suit”, featured in the movie Sing. It was the followup to his big hit, “Just Got Paid”. However, just like his “Suit”, the results were… barren. It was a #36 peak for the song before it fell off the charts, and that was it for Kemp. Yet again, two decades passed until we could celebrate another birthday in the top 40.

The last two examples of our birthday bonanza tend to be a little more on the naughty side. Listen, you can do whatever you want to, I’m not judging. In 2009, R&B singer Jeremih hit #4 with his debut single, “Birthday Sex”. In some cases, the radio version was known as “Birthday Shhh”, and a lack of support from some programmers who didn’t feel the subject material was appropriate left it dangling just outside the top ten on CHR radio. The other missed the top 40 entirely on the format, but was a big hit at Urban radio. Rihanna, in a remix with boyfriend turned ex-boyfriend turned boyfriend Chris Brown, took a remix of “Birthday Cake” to #24 on the Hot 100 last year.

There have been other format-specific examples of “birthday” songs, like Good Charlotte‘s “Like It’s Her Birthday” from 2010 (#33 CHR) or “Birthday Song” by 2 Chainz and Kanye West (#9 Urban) from just a few months ago, but neither had enough strength to crack the top 40 on Billboard’s big survey.

That does it for our topic of the day. Hope you enjoyed unwrapping this post, and if you want more presents from the top of the pops, follow the blog by clicking the tab below or follow me on Twitter: @AdamFSoybel.

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More Than Words: Song Titles That Stretch (Longer And Longer)

Boy, is that long.

Boy, is that long.

The comeback of indie rockers Fall Out Boy has also issued in a return of those long song titles with the unnecessary subtitles that were popular about five or so years ago. “My Songs Know What You Did In The Dark (Light Em Up)”, their newest single, has nine words in its main title along with a three word subtitle, totaling 12 words. However, it’s not the longest top-40 song title of all-time. In fact, two other songs by the band are on this list, which just shows how much they like the idea. Here’s a look at some of the rest of those pop hits that pack on the wordage: nine or more in the main title or twelve or more total.

(Information is provided by the Billboard Hot 100 prior to the fall of 1973 and Radio & Records/Mediabase through 2013. The list is composed of individual song titles, so double a-sided releases with two separate songs credited as opposed to a medley of them are not counted.)

There’s at least a dozen examples of top-40 singles with nine words in their main title. They range from 1965’s “May The Bird Of Paradise Fly Up Your Nose” by Little Jimmy Dickens (#15) to 1988’s “I Don’t Wanna Go On With You Like That” by Elton John (#2) to 2001’s “Stuck In A Moment You Can’t Get Out Of” by U2 (#30). Two such singles went to #1: “Tie A Yellow Ribbon ‘Round The Ole Oak Tree” by Tony Orlando and Dawn from 1973 and “When The Going Get Tough, The Tough Get Going” by Billy Ocean from 1986.

Here’s where the numbers start shrinking. Only four songs have gone top-40 with ten words in their main title. In 1976, ABBA went to #17 with “I Do, I Do, I Do, I Do, I Do”. Twenty years later, Bryan Adams rose to #20 with “The Only Thing That Looks Good On Me Is You”. The last two examples charted within less than six months of each other. From 2006, Fall Out Boy hit with “A Little Less Sixteen Candles, A Little More “Touch Me”” (#32) and then Panic! At The Disco got to #35 with “The Only Difference Between Martyrdom And Suicide Is Press Coverage”. I bet you thought that was a mouthful.

Going up to eleven words, we have two titles. The first, in 1968, was the last top ten hit for vocal group The Lettermen: the medley of “Goin’ Out Of My Head/Can’t Take My Eyes Off You”, originally by Little Anthony & the Imperials and Frankie Valli, respectively. It rose to #7, tying for their best peak position of all-time. In the summer of 1996, the only big song for the Primitive Radio Gods found itself at that same peak. It was called “Standing Outside A Broken Phone Booth With Money In My Hand”.

After Meat Loaf‘s grand comeback in 1993 with “I’d Do Anything For Love (But I Won’t Do That)”, the singer went to #20 the next year with an emotional song, “Objects In The Rear View Mirror May Appear Closer Than They Are”, which stands at 12 words total. Only one other top-40 hit made it there, but with the help of a subtitle like Fall Out Boy‘s newest release. That was “Son Of A Gun (I Betcha Think This Song Is About You)” by Janet Jackson in collaboration with Missy Elliott, Carly Simon, and P. Diddy on some remixed versions. It stalled out at #22 towards the end of 2001.

Ray Stevens is best known for big #1 hits like comedy record “The Streak” (1974) and the more Country-tinged “Everything Is Beautiful” (1970), but back in 1961, he garnered his very first hit with novelty single “Jeremiah Peabody’s Polyunsaturated Quick Dissolving Fast Acting Pleasant Tasting Green and Purple Pills”, at 13 words in length. It peaked at #35.

The Bellamy Brothers had a #1 smash on the pop survey in 1976 with “Let Your Love Flow”. Their second and last top-40 crossover single was 1979’s “If I Said You Had A Beautiful Body, Would You Hold It Against Me”, which clocks in at 14 words. It spent two weeks at #39 on the Hot 100 (Radio & Records only published a top 30 at that point) and also went to #1 on the Country chart.

In 1985, the duo of Daryl Hall and John Oates were coming off another big era in Big Bam Boom, which landed them a one-off concert at the Apollo Theater in New York City. It was recorded into a full-length live album, and one-half of their opening medley was edited into a single that climbed to #24. The full title? “A Night at the Apollo Live! The Way You Do The Things You Do/My Girl”, sixteen words in length. After that, the terrific twosome never released a single more than five words long.

Beating them by one word is the last spot on this list by Fall Out Boy with a song they released in 2007, again, extended by an itsy bitsy subtitle. “I’m Like A Lawyer With The Way I’m Always Trying To Get You Off (Me & You)” peaked at #25, and could’ve been at the top of this list, peaking at 17 words, 14 in the main title. Alas, it only comes in second.

If you remember the charts in the early 1980’s, then you’ll probably know this song, or at least the components of it. Sometimes it was just referred to as “Medley” or “Beatles Medley” for the sake of convenience, but on the record itself and on the charts, every single song included was listed out in full. So, the longest title in terms of words to make the top 40 is (deep breath in) “Medley: Intro Venus/Sugar Sugar/No Reply/I’ll Be Back/Drive My Car/Do You Want To Know A Secret?/We Can Work It Out/I Should Have Known Better/Nowhere Man/You’re Going To Lose That Girl /Stars On 45”, a whopping forty-one words for the Dutch studio group Stars On 45. It went to #3 in airplay and #1 on the Hot 100 for a week. They charted a handful of times with other medleys on Billboard after that colossal single, but all of them had reduced titles like “More Stars” or “Stars on 45 III: In Tribute To Stevie Wonder”.

Well, that was a whole lot of words, but something tells me I’ve forgotten one or two, so I need you help. Can you think of any other hit singles that managed a length of at least nine words? Let me know in the comments or find me on Twitter at @AdamFSoybel.

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Return To Sender: A “No Mail On Saturday” Playlist

You've got mail.

You’ve got mail.

It was announced earlier this week that the U.S. Postal Service will be eliminating Saturday mail delivery this August (though packages aren’t affected to be this decision.) There’s been mixed reaction to the announcement, but it appears that it won’t be reversed – for now, at least. While you’re counting down the days until the six-day delivery system goes away, here are six of my favorite songs about the postal service, writing letters and more from the past fifty or so years. Hopefully, you can cope with this playlist from the P.O. box of pop music.

“BECAUSE I LOVE YOU (THE POSTMAN SONG)”
Stevie B made a name for himself on the freestyle circuit, charting for several years on the Hot 100 with minor entries that also hit the Dance Chart. Then, in 1990, the singer released this big ballad which became his signature song, spending four weeks at the top of the chart. Too bad the postman couldn’t answer his request for additional singles with that kind of chart presence. After some weaker top-40 hits, he was off the scene by 1995.

“PLEASE MR. POSTMAN”
Here’s one of two songs on the list that made the national charts three times. Back in 1961, a trio out of Michigan named The Marvelettes took the song to #1 for one week in December 1961. It was the first number-one record for the fledgling Tamla Records, a subsidiary label of Motown. They followed it with “Twistin’ Postman” the next year, but it just scratched the top 40. Then, in 1974, duo the Carpenters recorded their version of the tune, and it also went to #1 for one week in January 1975. It would be the last time the graced the top of the Hot 100. “Postman” last made the Hot 100 in a version by R&B trio Gentle Persuasion, which went to #82 in 1983. It essentially came off as a second-rate version of The Pointer Sisters and became their only charting single.

“P.S. I LOVE YOU”
Written by Paul McCartney, this one made the charts just about a month after The Beatles claimed the top five singles in the nation in late March 1964. Originally the b-side of their #1 single, “Love Me Do”, it went to #10 on the Hot 100 in 1964, an unexpectedly high charting for the flip side of a record, but it is Fab Four we’re talking about. The band also covered other mail-themed songs like the aforementioned “Please Mr. Postman” and Buddy Holly‘s “Mailman, Bring Me No More Blues”.

“SIGNED, SEALED, DELIVERED (I’M YOURS)”
It’s another classic song from Tamla Records, originally recorded by the great Stevie Wonder. The song became his first top ten hit of the 70’s, going to #3 on the Hot 100. “Signed” also went as high as #18 in a remake by Peter Frampton in 1977. I personally really like his version, though I know many people who don’t. It was Frampton’s second-to-last top-40 hit.

“STRAWBERRY LETTER 23”
I’m not a huge fan in general of this next group on the list, but this is probably my favorite song from The Brothers Johnson, who remade a 1971 album track by Johnny Otis and turned it into a #5 hit on the Hot 100 in 1977. Plus, I hear the vinyl single pressings had a strawberry scent to them. Sweet. A remake with an added rap break by young R&B singer Tevin Campbell peaked at #53 on the Hot 100 in 1992, though it hit the top 40 in CHR airplay.

“THE LETTER”
Having a number-one hit with your debut single seems to be a common thread amongst many of the acts in this post like Stevie Wonder, The Beatles and The Marvelettes. Well, The Box Tops did it too, with a #1 for four weeks on the Hot 100 in the fall of 1967. It was remade by soft-rock quartet The Arbors, peaking at #20 in 1969. Lastly, a version by Joe Cocker went to #7 in 1970. It was co-produced by Leon Russell.

Other post-worthy odes to the postal service since the 60’s:
“A Letter To Myself”, The Chi-Lites (1973)
“Amsterdam (Gonna Write You A Letter)”, Guster (2003)
“Another Postcard (Chimps)”, Barenaked Ladies (2003)
“In Your Letter”, REO Speedwagon (1981)
“Rock And Roll Love Letter”, The Bay City Rollers (1976)
“Take A Letter Maria”, R.B. Greaves (1969)

Can’t forget about the one in the title… “Return To Sender” by Elvis Presley. It hit #2 on the Hot 100 in 1962.

Have another song you’d like to add that got lost in transit? Let me know in the comments or on Twitter: @AdamFSoybel.

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