Tag Archives: Roxette

Go To “Church”: Chart Hits Worth The Worship

Songs at your service.

Songs at your service.

Everyone is buzzing about the debut single from 24-year-old Irish newcomer Hozier“Take Me To Church”. After a lengthy rise up the AAA survey, it’s finally made it to #1 as it continues to pile on airplay at the Alternative format, as well as begin its crossover to CHR and Hot AC radio. Now, while synagogue may be my place of choice when it comes to religious preference, there are still plenty of churchgoers around and a few of them have sung about it. So, while the latest “Church” sits just below the Hot 100, waiting to deliver its sermon upon the surveys, here are some of the other charting singles on the topic from the holy scripture we call Billboard:

“The Church Bells May Ring”, The Diamonds (#14, 1956)
Originally done by a group called The Willows, the version by this Canadian quartet broke the top 40 and became another moderate single for the four. One year later, they would score with their signature song, “Little Darlin'”, which climbed to #2.

“I Met Her In Church”, The Box Tops (#37, 1968)
“The Letter” (#1) and “Cry Like A Baby” (#2) put them in the national spotlight when it came to giant releases, but even their more obscure singles struck a chord with the buying public. Barely a top 40 entry, it was one of two charters from Non-Stop.

“Church Street Soul Revival”, Tommy James (#62, 1970)
After breaking off with his band The Shondells, James turned his attention to what should’ve been a decent-sized solo career, but the notable singles didn’t come easily. Unfortunately, this cut from 1971’s Christian Of The World isn’t well-remembered.

“I Hear Those Church Bells Ringing”, Dusk (#53, 1971)
Peggy Santiglia made it to #1 on the Hot 100 with The Angels on “My Boyfriend’s Back”, and years after that classic smash, she led this band to some minimal success. Followup “Angel Baby” stalled in the 50’s before the short-lived act called it quits.

“Church”, Bob Welch (#73, 1979)
After leaving Fleetwood Mac at the end of 1974, Welch had a small run of solo songs on the national pop survey. This was the followup to “Precious Love”, a top 20 hit, but this second single from Three Hearts didn’t do as well. He passed away in 2012.

“Church Of The Poison Mind”, Culture Club (#10, 1983)
The hype was big for Colour By Numbers, this quartet’s second album, and it was no sophomore slump. Climbing to a peak of #10 on the Hot 100 in December, it was their fourth consecutive top ten release. It also peaked at #2 in the United Kingdom.

“Church Of Your Heart”, Roxette (#36, 1992)
Sweden’s dynamic duo took a Joyride to the top in 1991, but their time on the highway to hits were numbered. “Church” went top 20 on CHR radio, though it just dented the top 40 on the Hot 100, becoming their lowest charting release up to that time.

“Little White Church”, Little Big Town (#59, 2010)
After the struggling A Place To Land era failed to answer their prayers, this “Church” became the first top ten on the Country chart for the group since 2006’s “Good As Gone”. It was their second certified single, selling 500,000 copies and going Gold.

“No Church In The Wild”, Jay-Z and Kanye West featuring Frank Ocean (#72, 2012)
Taken from Watch The Throne, this certainly wasn’t the biggest in terms of peak position, but the collaboration between the two rappers and singer did sell enough to go Gold. It was put in several movie trailers and an advertising campaign for Dodge.

Which of these songs get you in the spirit of spirits? Let me know! Comment below or click the “Get Social!” tab to find PGTC on social media.

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How Swede It Is: The Icon(a)ic Hit Parade

I like it, "I Love It".

I like it, “I Love It”.

Whether it’s on the radio or in an advertisement, you know the sounds of Icona Pop and their hit song called “I Love It”. It’s currently #33 on the Hot 100 and #21 on mainstream radio. The all-female duo of Aino Jawo and Caroline Hjelt represents the 20th act from Sweden to hit the airplay chart (Radio & Records/Mediabase 24/7) since it began in 1973, though most of these artists also made the Hot 100 in one form or another. (I’ll be listing the peaks from both charts in some cases.) How swede it is to be loved by our American audience. From ABBA to Roxette to Swedish House Mafia, here’s the full list of acts who have charted with the times.

ABBA / AGNETHA FÄLTSKOG / FRIDA
By far the most successful act on the list, the quartet formed in Stockholm amassed twenty hits on the Hot 100 from 1974 to 1982, fourteen of them becoming top-40 entries. Of those, four made the top ten like “Waterloo” (1974) and “Take A Chance On Me” (1978), with “Dancing Queen” rising to #1 in 1977, their only chart-topper. After the group disbanded, the two female singers in the band each had one top-40 solo hit. Frida (Anni-Frid Lyngstad) went to #13 in the spring of 1983 with “I Know There’s Something Going On” (co-produced by Phil Collins) and Agentha Fältskog managed a #29 peak for “Can’t Shake Loose” during the fall of that same year. Fältskog has a new solo album due later this spring. The group has never performed together since they parted.

ACE OF BASE / YAKI-DA
Four performers from Gothenberg were all over the radio in 1993 and 1994 with songs like “All That She Wants”, “Don’t Turn Around” and “The Sign”. Five of their singles went top ten at CHR radio, but “Sign” was the only one to top the Hot 100, holding there for six weeks. Eight of their songs made the big chart, the final two coming in 1998. They’re currently together, but the two female singers were replaced during their most recent album in 2010. In 1995, member Jonas “Joker” Berggren put together the duo Yaki-Da, also from Gothenberg. Their lone hit, “I Saw You Dancing”, went to #52 on the Hot 100 and #20 on the CHR chart.

AVICII
The 23-year-old DJ from Stockholm has been mixing it up for several years now. Last year, his “Levels (ID)”, sampled in the arrangement of Flo Rida‘s “Good Feeling”, only reached #60 on the Hot 100 and #34 on CHR radio, largely overshadowed by the rapper’s hit. His current single, “I Could Be The One” (credited to Avicii vs. Nicky Romero), is top 40 at the radio format, but has yet to make Billboard’s list.

BLUE SWEDE
Ooga chaka, ooga ooga. The band from Stockholm led by Björn Skifs took their version of “Hooked On A Feeling” to #1 for a week in 1974. Four of their singles charted on the Hot 100, the last of them a medley of “Hush” by Deep Purple and “I’m Alive” by Tommy James & The Shondells, which went to #61 in 1975. They haven’t appeared together since then.

EAGLE-EYE CHERRY / NENEH CHERRY
The half-siblings of the Cherry family saw their biggest success in different decades. Neneh Cherry is best remembered for her 1989 hit “Buffalo Stance”, which climbed to #3 on the Hot 100. Five of her songs made the chart, four as a main credited artist. Eagle-Eye Cherry‘s biggest single was “Save Tonight”, which went to #5 on the Hot 100 and #1 on CHR radio in 1999. Two more of his songs garnered some airplay, the latter one peaking in 2002, but neither is remembered today. Neneh now performs with a band called The Thing; Eagle-Eye still records as a solo artist.

EMILIA
Emilia Rydberg, who recorded as Emilia, scored a huge hit in Europe with 1998’s “Big Big World”, which impacted the United States at end of the year. It barely cracked the Hot 100 at a peak of #92, though it rose to #19 on CHR radio before falling quickly falling out. She performs today as Emilia Mitiku.

EUROPE
How can you deny the epic synthesizer line in “The Final Countdown”? A classic in the world of pop, it reached a high of #8 on the Hot 100 in 1987 for the quintet from Upplands Väsby. Power ballad “Carrie” went to #3 later that year. A total of five of their songs reached the Hot 100, the last of them coming in the fall of 1988. The band is still active today with a different lineup.

LEGACY OF SOUND / MEJA
Dancing onto the scene in 1993, the group had only one song hit the U.S. market, “Happy”. It managed a lowly #68 on the Hot 100 and a #25 peak on CHR radio. Vocalist Meja cracked the CHR chart twice as a solo artist with “All ‘Bout The Money” (#36, 1999) and a duet with Ricky Martin, “Private Emotion” (#29, 2000). “Money” failed to make the Hot 100; “Emotion” rose to #67. She still sings today.

REDNEX
What the folk is going on? Marrying bluegrass with a eurodance beat, the novelty hit “Cotton Eye Joe”, based on the nineteenth-century southern song, went to #25 on the Hot 100 in 1995. It was certified Gold. They never charted again here, but they’ve hit the top ten in Sweden as recently as 2008. The group remains together.

ROBYN
The sweet pop sounds of Robyn were all over the U.S. by 1997 including “Do You Know (What It Takes?)” and “Show Me Love”, both going top ten. An additional airplay-only single, “Do You Really Want Me?”, made the top ten at CHR radio in 1998. She made a triumphant return with a dance sound in the 2000’s, scoring a handful of hits across Europe, but nothing charted nationally here. She last put out a series of EPs in 2010 and no new material has been announced as of yet.

ROXETTE
The duo of Marie Fredriksson and Per Gessle out of Halmstad took the U.S. by storm in 1989 with their #1 hit “The Look”, followed by two other #1’s: “It Must Have Been Love” in 1990 (featured in the movie Pretty Woman) and “Joyride” in 1991. Six of their songs made the top 2 in a two-year span, which gives the largest amount of top ten singles for a Swedish act. In total, twelve of their singles hit the Hot 100 through 1994, with a few additional releases receiving Adult Contemporary airplay in the years since then. The two continue to record, both solo and together, last putting out original material as a duo in 2012.

SEPTEMBER
Petra Marklund, who took the stage name September, started her career in Sweden in 2003, but the performer from Stockholm didn’t reach the Hot 100 until 2008 when “Cry For You” peaked at #74. It also spent three weeks at #29 on CHR radio, two of them dated on September charts. She hasn’t hit nationally since, but continues to make the top ten in her native country under her given name.

SWEDISH HOUSE MAFIA
The trio of DJs Axwell, Sebastian Ingrosso and Steve Angello have been together since 2008. They first made the the CHR chart in 2011 with “Save The World” (#37), but it failed to make the Hot 100 by just a few positions. Last year, “Don’t You Worry Child” became their biggest hit ever in almost every territory, including a #6 peak on the Hot 100 and a better #2 at CHR earlier this year. They’ve broken up for the time being.

THE CARDIGANS
From the city of Jönköping, this quintet led by Nina Persson scored an international hit with “Lovefool”. It wasn’t eligible for the Hot 100 at the time due to a rule barring airplay-only singles from charting, but it did climb to #1 on the Hot 100 Airplay survey and spent six weeks at #1 on CHR radio during the spring of 1997. They had several other hits in Europe, but broke up in 2006 before reuniting last year.

Who is your favorite act from Sweden to break in America? Let me know in the comments or on Twitter: @AdamFSoybel.

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