Tag Archives: Poco

A “Town” For Two: Twice The Top 40 Titles

A toast to ghosts.

A toast to ghosts.

In the last day, it was announced that Adam Lambert‘s first single from his Warner Bros. debut, The Original High, is a song titled “Ghost Town”. It will be released on April 21. This comes at the same time that Madonna‘s current release, title stylized as “Ghosttown”, is charting at both AC and Hot AC radio outlets thanks to an iHeartMedia campaign that bares a similar feel to the one U2‘s “Every Breaking Wave” utilized from late last year to early this year. Needless to stay, the stan reaction has been mixed thus far, but I think we’ll all survive and both singles can co-exist together… right? Now, can they rank together?

(By the way, ghost towns are nothing new when it comes to the top 40; just ask “Ghost Town” by Cheap Trick, which hit #33 in late 1988. Yes, I know it’s not remembered well and I would be the one to cite that. Ghost Town DJ’s, anyone?)

So, with this case in mind, I figured we could take a look at some classic examples that put two singles with the same title, but a different composition, in the top 40 of the Hot 100 at the same time. It’s pretty rare, but the few times it’s happened are pretty interesting to any chart buff. Here are some of the notable ones:

*** Dates listed next to each title indicate the first week of the songs appearing together in the top 40

“Crazy Love” (April 7, 1979)
Poco (#33) (Peak: #17) (Listen)
The Allman Brothers Band (#39) (Peak: #29) (Listen)

The first documented case of this occurrence goes back nearly 36 years to when these two bands appeared with their hit songs in the top 40 for just one frame. At the time, it was a pretty remarkable chart achievement given the turnover rate and heavier competition during those disco days. Both acts would score their final hits in the next decade, the former after nearly a decade away from the top 40.

“Don’t Be Cruel” (August 20, 1988)
Cheap Trick (#37) (Peak: #4) (Listen)
Bobby Brown (#38) (Peak: #8) (Listen)

Here’s what may be the most unusual case of the ones presented here. Both “Cruel” cuts debuted in the top 40 during the same week and next to each other! For two weeks in October, they both resided in the top ten, including a week when the former fell to #9, while the latter jumped to #8 (October 22, 1988). Of course, the band covered an Elvis Presley tune, while Brown’s hit was an original song.

“Hold On” (May 12, 1990)
Wilson Phillips (#6) (Peak: #1) (Listen)
En Vogue (#32) (Peak: #2) (Listen)

Much like the previous 1988 example, these two female groups both crossed paths in the top ten later that summer and spent a week back-to-back for the chart date of June 30, 1990 (the former down to #5, while the latter climbed to #6.) Both California acts were on the Hot 100 with their debut singles and the trio and quartet, respectively, would have a number of other songs in the top five nationally.

“Beautiful” (March 1, 2003)
Christina Aguilera (#8) (Peak: #2) (Listen)
Snoop Dogg featuring Pharrell and Uncle Charlie Wilson (#37) (Peak: #6) (Listen)

It was during the first weeks of 2003 that the pop chanteuse shined with her strong multi-format ballad, a song that would turn into one of the biggest singles of her career. However, when the big Dogg comes barking into town, people will be tuning in. So, both appeared in the top 40 together through mid-May. On CHR radio, Aguilera’s hit spent four weeks at #1, while the trio just broke into the top 30.

Besides the chart collisions listed above, several other CHR radio only chart events happened, including two “Runaway” songs in October 1995 by Janet Jackson (#2) (Listen) and The Corrs (#37) (Listen) as well as two “Stop” songs in June 1998 from Meredith Brooks (#36) (Listen) and the Spice Girls (#38) (Listen). (These stats are based on the Radio & Records survey.)

For more chart trivia and much more music madness, follow the blog by clicking below and/or click the “Get Social!” page link at the top to find PGTC on social media sites like Facebook, Twitter and more.

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Filed under Charts/Trade Papers

TOP TEN: The “Voices” Of ’89 — Should’ve Been A Top Ten Hit

"Secret" musical treasures.

“Secret” musical treasures.

Looking at a huge #1 debut on the Billboard 200 album chart next week is Taylor Swift‘s latest album 1989, inspired by the music that filled the mainstream airwaves during the latter part of the 80’s. It was a time of glossy production, strong hooks and energetic melodies. I was inspired myself, and so I had to take a dip back into the archives, specifically looking at those singles that didn’t get their due justice on the charts back then. There were dozens upon dozens on the shortlist of those songs I wished were top ten hits, and somehow, I whittled it down to ten. Crazy. Let’s see what you think of some of my favorite underrated musical memories of 1989:

(This list of singles was compiled by looking at the chart peaks on three active trade papers at the time: the Billboard Hot 100, the Cashbox Top 100 Singles chart and the Radio & Records CHR radio survey. Those songs that went top ten on at least one chart were not included. You’ll note their peaks in this order: (Billboard / Cashbox / Radio & Records). Enjoy!)

GRAYSON HUGH, “Talk It Over” (#19 / #19 / #23)
At 29 years old, the Connecticut born singer charted his sole top 40 single, a soulful tune that was originally recorded and released by Olivia Newton-John on The Rumour in 1988. Hugh’s song also went top ten on Adult Contemporary radio.

KON KAN, “I Beg Your Pardon” (#15 / #22 / #18)
The Canadian duo of producer Barry Harris and singer Kevin Wynne danced their way onto the charts with this energetic club track, sampling Lynn Anderson‘s 1971 crossover hit “(I Never Promised You A) Rose Garden”, among other cuts.

KYLIE MINOGUE, “It’s No Secret” (#37 / #32 / #32)
Well, it is no secret that Minogue should’ve been treated better by the U.S. market; alas, three singles from Kylie did rank on the national pop charts. The track is a great pop gem, but following “The Loco-Motion”, this one derailed the era here.

MARTIKA, “More Than You Know” (#18 / #17 / #16)
From the small screen of Kids Incorporated to the big boom of the music industry, “More” went top 40 before this young singer turned 20. She’s best known for its followup, single “Toy Soldiers”, an emotional ballad that spent two weeks at #1.

POCO, “Call It Love” (#18 / #18 / #20)
Ten years after launching a pair of singles into the top 20, 1979’s “Crazy Love” (#17) and “Heart Of The Night” (#20), the California supergroup, with a lead vocal by Rusty Young, made an unexpected comeback, but one of the best of the year.

ROACHFORD, “Cuddly Toy (Feel For Me)” (#25 / #30 / #22)
Led by singer Andrew Roachford, the initial release of “Cuddly” in the United Kingdom was a dud, only reaching a high of #61. The second time out, it went to #4 and led to a Stateside release. Their top 40 days continued in the U.K. until 1998.

SOULSISTER, “The Way To Your Heart” (#41 / #44 / #33)
Long forgotten by the U.S. charts, this amazing Motown throwback was a hit across some European countries in late 1988 before crossing here the next year to minimal results. The duo continued to release music in Europe though the mid-90’s.

THE BELLE STARS, “Iko Iko” (#14 / #16 / #17)
First a hit in the U.S. for The Dixie Cups (#20) in 1965, this version was originally released in 1982 before breaking out here in 1989 thanks to its inclusion in the successful film Rain Man. However, the septet was disbanded during its reissue.

THE OUTFIELD, “Voices Of Babylon” (#25 / #26 / #23)
Everyone sings along to the classic “Your Love”, their enduring top ten hit from 1986, but this is by far my favorite single from the English trio (now performing as a duo.) Though the album of the same name didn’t sell well, the song is a winner.

XTC, ‘The Mayor Of Simpleton” (#72 / #67 / #–)
With a 40-position survey, this one didn’t quite make it onto R&R, but it did well with the college crowd and spent several weeks at #1 on the Modern Rock chart. The English quintet stayed together for three decades, but officially split in 2006.

Do you have a favorite underrated 1989 single from the selections above or one that I didn’t mention? Comment below or click the “Get Social!” tab to find PGTC on social media.

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Filed under Retro