Tag Archives: Florence Welch

GRAMMY WEEK: Adam Picks The Winners for Dance/Pop Fields

Gram bam, thank you, ma'am.

Gram bam, thank you, ma’am.

It’s finally here… the week before the 56th Annual GRAMMY Awards, airing on Sunday, January 26 at 8PM Eastern on CBS. This week on POP! Goes The Charts, we’ll be taking a look at nearly half the categories on the list and laying out who I think will taking home a prize or two or five (maybe!) on the big day. Let’s go for the Dance and Pop fields, shall we?

(For a full list of nominations, check it out on GRAMMY.com along with more interactive features. You can also order the 2014 GRAMMY Nominees album, from Atlantic Records.)

5. Best Pop Solo Performance

Brave”, Sara Bareilles
“Royals”, Lorde (***ACTUAL WINNER***)
“When I Was Your Man”, Bruno Mars
“Roar”, Katy Perry
“Mirrors”, Justin Timberlake

PREDICTION: Difficult decision right here. “Brave” and “Roar” will probably cancel each other out (if only Bareilles and Perry would do a medley on GRAMMY night!) A safer choice would be Bruno Mars‘s “When I Was Your Man”; it’s a classic ballad.

6. Best Pop Duo/Group Performance

“Get Lucky”, Daft Punk featuring Pharrell Williams & Nile Rodgers (***ACTUAL WINNER***)
“Just Give Me A Reason”, Pink featuring Nate Ruess
“Stay”, Rihanna featuring Mikky Ekko
“Blurred Lines”, Robin Thicke featuring T.I. & Pharrell
“Suit & Tie”, Justin Timberlake featuring Jay Z

PREDICTION: This is tough too. Looks like we’re going to have another year where the winner of this category also wins one of the Big Four, whether it’s “Blurred Lines”, “Get Lucky” or “Just Give Me A Reason”. I’m going with the Pink and Nate Ruess duet.

7. Best Pop Instrumental Album

Steppin’ Out, Herb Alpert (***ACTUAL WINNER***)
The Beat, Boney James
Handpicked, Earl Klugh
Summer Horns, Dave Koz, Gerald Albright, Mindi Abair & Richard Elliot
Hacienda, Jeff Lorber Fusion

PREDICTION: Again, this isn’t my best area of expertise, but I know a lot of these names from the occasional look at the Jazz survey. A version of “Puttin’ On The Ritz” from Alpert’s album just got serviced to AC radio; it could be a sign that this this one is his.

8. Best Pop Vocal Album

ParadiseLana Del Rey
Pure HeroineLorde
Unorthodox JukeboxBruno Mars (***ACTUAL WINNER***)
Blurred Lines, Robin Thicke
The 20/20 Experience – The Complete Experience, Justin Timberlake

PREDICTION: Believe it or not, this is the only category in which Justin Timberlake‘s album is nominated for. Is that some major shade on the Academy’s part? Yet, the biggest album of last year has to win something, right? It would only seem fair to me.

9. Best Dance Recording

“Need U (100%)”Duke Dumont featuring A*M*E & MNEK
Adam Dyment & Tommy Forrest, producers and mixers

“Sweet Nothing”, Calvin Harris featuring Florence Welch
Harris, producer and mixer

“Atmosphere”, Kaskade
Finn Bjarnson & Ryan Raddon, producers; Raddon, mixer

“This Is What It Feels Like”, Armin Van Buuren featuring Trevor Guthrie
Armin Van Buuren & Benno De Goeij, producers and mixers

“Clarity”, Zedd featuring Foxes
Zedd, producer and mixer (***ACTUAL WINNER***)

PREDICTION: With no Skrillex in the mix (and no Al Wasser, thank God), this category is probably going to go back to one of the bigger hits of the bunch, most likely “Clarity” or “Sweet Nothing”. Of the two, I prefer the Calvin Harris and Florence Welch song.

10. Best Dance/Electronica Album

Random Access Memories, Daft Punk (***ACTUAL WINNER***)
SettleDisclosure
18 MonthsCalvin Harris
AtmosphereKaskade
A Color Map Of The SunPretty Lights

PREDICTION: There was no bigger Dance album in 2013 than Random Access Memories. Daft Punk didn’t just get lucky; they knocked it out of the park. The critical acclaim of Disclosure will keep it in the running, but the French duo will likely take it.

11. Best Traditional Pop Vocal Album

Viva DuetsTony Bennett and Various Artists
To Be Loved, Michael Bublé (***ACTUAL WINNER***)
The StandardsGloria Estefan
Cee Lo’s Magic MomentCee Lo Green
NowDionne Warwick

PREDICTION: This category is usually a two horse race between Bennett and Bublé, and because the Canadian crooner didn’t win last year for his Christmas album, I think Michael Bublé is overdue for yet another win here. “It’s A Beautiful Day” indeed.

67. Best Engineered Album, Non-Classical

Annie UpPistol Annies
Chuck Ainlay, engineer; Bob Ludwig, mastering engineer

The Blue RoomMadeleine Peyroux
Helik Hadar & Leslie Ann Jones, engineers; Bernie Grundman, mastering engineer

The Devil Put Dinosaurs HereAlice In Chains
Paul Figueroa & Randy Staub, engineers; Ted Jensen, mastering engineer

…Like ClockworkQueens Of The Stone Age
Joe Barresi & Mark Rankin, engineers; Gavin Lurssen, mastering engineer

The MooringsAndrew Duhon
Trina Shoemaker, engineer; Eric Conn, mastering engineer

Random Access Memories, Daft Punk
Peter Franco, Mick Guzauski, Florian Lagatta & Daniel Lerner, engineers; Antoine “Chab” Chabert, Bob Ludwig, mastering engineers (***ACTUAL WINNER***)

PREDICTION: I don’t know a ton about this category, but the winners in past years have been a real mix of commercial releases and some lesser-known works. Though I’m placing Daft Punk for the win here, it could essentially be any one of these six.

68. Producer Of The Year, Non-Classical

Rob Cavallo
Dr. Luke
Ariel Rechtshaid
Jeff Tweedy
Pharrell Williams (***ACTUAL WINNER***)

PREDICTION: I love Rob Cavallo and would be thrilled to see him win this category, but 2013 was clearly the year of Pharrell Williams, both as a producer and singer, and he’s very much deserving of this honor. Tell Dr. Luke to go back to medical school.

69. Best Remixed Recording, Non-Classical

“Days Turn Into Nights”, Delerium featuring Michael Logen
Andy Caldwell, remixer

“If I Lose Myself”, OneRepublic
Alesso, remixer

“Locked Out Of Heaven”, Bruno Mars
Ned Shepard & Sultan, remixers

“One Love/People Get Ready”, Bob Marley and The Wailers
Rupert Parkes (Photek), remixer

“Summertime Sadness”, Lana Del Rey
Cedric Gervais, remixer (***ACTUAL WINNER***)

PREDICTION: Long after Lana Del Rey had been written off in the U.S., Interscope’s push of the Cedric Gervais remix of “Summertime Sadness” launched her at radio, selling over 2 million copies with all versions combined. Not so sad anymore, huh?
_____

Check back tomorrow to see what I take a second swing at predicting the Big Four! Until then, follow the blog below and find us on social media by click the “Get Social!” tab.

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Home “Sweet” Home: A Collection Of Chart Candy

This sweet talkin' woman won't slow down.

This sweet talkin’ woman won’t slow down.

It’s still gaining on the radio even if it’s fallen back a bit on the Hot 100, but the single between producer Calvin Harris and singer Florence Welch is a hit, “Sweet Nothing”. It peaked at #1 in the United Kingdom back in October, but we’re always late when it comes to these kind of songs from overseas. In fact, “Nothing” peaked at #10 on the Hot 100 just last week. Today, we’ll be taking a look at some pretty sweet facts when it comes to these pop confections. Although we had some “sweet” singles in the 60’s like Brenda Lee‘s similarly titled “Sweet Nothin’s” (#4, 1960) and Neil Diamond‘s “Sweet Caroline” (#6, 1969), this list will be focused on those songs that hit the charts since 1970. The Harris/Welch collaboration marks the 25th song to pull off the feat since then. Get ready to sink your teeth into this.

(Information is based on the Hot 100 from 1970-1989. The Radio & Records airplay chart is used after 1990.)

THE 70’s
The 70’s were the sweetest of the decades of the list with eleven different top ten singles. Of them, only one went to the #1, the very first of them: “My Sweet Lord”, the 1970 single by George Harrison. It held down the top for three official charts and a one-week holiday break for a combined amount of four weeks. Another went as high as #3: Tony Orlando and Dawn‘s “Say, Has Anybody Seen My Sweet Gypsy Rose?” from 1973. Four top ten titles from 1971 featured the word “sweet” in them, the most of any year regardless of the decade on this list. They were “Sweet Hitch-Hiker” by Creedence Clearwater Revival (#6), “Sweet And Innocent” by Donny Osmond (#7), “Sweet Mary” by Wadsworth Mansion (#7) and “Sweet City Woman” by The Stampeders (#8). The latter two acts are generally considered one-hit wonders, though The Stampeders would find their way back to the top 40 for a grand total of one week in 1975 with a cover of “Hit The Road Jack”.

Of the other five, three were by groups: Commodores (“Sweet Love” – #5 in 1976), Lynyrd Skynyrd (“Sweet Home Alabama” – #8 in 1974) and Rufus with Chaka Khan (“Sweet Thing” – #5 in 1976). Two singer-songwriters finish our look at the decade: Carole King, who went to #9 in 1972 with “Sweet Seasons”, and James Taylor, who in 1975 went to #5 with his remake of “How Sweet It Is (To Be Loved By You)”. The original version by Marvin Gaye went to #6 ten years prior. A third version by Jr. Walker & the All Stars just missed the top ten in 1966.

THE 80’s
The sugar lingered into the electronic 80’s with another eight “sweet” top tens, including two #1 songs in “Sweet Dreams (Are Made Of This)” by Eurythmics (1983) and “Sweet Child O’ Mine” by Guns N’ Roses (1988). Another two besides those chart-toppers were the debut top-40 singles on the Hot 100 for the respective two acts. In 1981, Franke and the Knockouts scored a #10 hit called “Sweetheart” and in 1986, Anita Baker rose to #8 with her soulful “Sweet Love”. On the other hand, one was also the last top-40 single for a solo male singer, Michael McDonald, with his #7 “Sweet Freedom” from 1986. McDonald continued to make the Adult Contemporary survey from several more decades.

Rounding out the pack are two #5 singles by Air Supply (“Sweet Dreams”, 1982) and Sade (“The Sweetest Taboo”, 1985) and a #7 charter from Juice Newton, 1982’s “The Sweetest Thing (I’ve Ever Known)”. “Taboo” was the second of two number-one singles for the band on the Adult Contemporary chart; “Thing” was the first of four number-one Country hits for Newton.

THE 90’s
Here’s where things cut off sharply. Despite a lot of close calls by acts like Mary J. Blige, Mötley Crüe and Sarah McLachlan, only two songs made it to the top ten during the 90’s and both within a few months of each other. In late 1995, Mariah Carey and Boyz II Men created a massive duet in “One Sweet Day”. It officially spent eight frames at the top between 1995 and 1996, though a two-week holiday freeze in-between technically lifts that total to ten weeks. It fell pretty sharply after it peaked, but understandably so. The other song to pull off the trick was “Sweet Dreams” by La Bouche, their second hit on the pop chart. It peaked at #5.

THE 00’s
For eleven years, not a single “sweet” song could break the top ten. How sour! That curse was broken in 2007 by a gal named Gwen and her Harajuku girls. That, of course, is Gwen Stefani, and she just missed the coveted top spot in 2007 with “The Sweet Escape”, featuring Akon. It was the highest ranking #2 single on that year’s end of the year chart. Returning as a featured artist the next year, Akon, along with rapper Lil Wayne and singer Niia were all included on Wyclef Jean‘s #10 single, “Sweetest Girl (Dollar Bill)”. Lastly, before “Sweet Nothing” came along, the most recent top ten title that brought the “sweet” factor was “Sweet Dreams” from the multi-talented Beyoncé. It reached #5 in 2009.

What song do you think is the sweetest of the sweet? Let me know in the comments or on Twitter: @AdamFSoybel.

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