Tag Archives: Aretha Franklin

TURN IT UP TUESDAY: What’s New In Stores This Week (October 21)

Looking for some not-so-"Mediocre" numbers.

Looking for some not-so-“Mediocre” numbers.

Rappers, rockers, reindeer lovers: they’re all in the mix this week as Q4 keeps chugging along at a faster pace. Here’s what albums and singles are in stores for the week of October 21:

  • No longer a Trouble Man and putting in his Paperwork is T.I., who has been hot on Rhythmic and Urban radio with hit singles like “About The Money” and “No Mediocre”, the former featuring Young Thug and the latter featuring Iggy Azalea. This is the rapper’s first album in two years and first since making the leap from Atlantic to Columbia Records. Look for it to be a contender for #1 next week. (iTunes)
  • Metal monsters Slipknot haven’t released a new studio album since 2008, but that changes this week when .5: The Gray Chapter debuts in stores. A single from it, “The Devil In I”, is shooting towards the #1 spot on the Active Rock airwaves, currently positioned at #2. Given the extended gap of time and high-ranking pre-release singles, this may also be in reach of the top. (iTunes)
  • After finishing their last era with a minor chart single called “Sober”, country quartet Little Big Town go for some “Day Drinking” on their latest set, Pain Killer. “Day” is currently top ten at Country radio and it appears that they’re due for another successful era. It should make a run at the top five on the Billboard 200, though it’ll fall short of #1. (iTunes)
  • The 24-year-old rapper named Logic has been noted on the underground circuit and blogosphere for several years now with a series of Young Sinatra mixtapes. This week, his first full-length album, Under Pressure, is out. Likely to be the surprise of the week, you may see the set bowing in the top five when all is said and done. (iTunes)
  • Ho, ho, hold on one moment — we have some sensational stocking stuffers sizzling on the scene, including Anthony Hamilton‘s Home For The Holidays (iTunes), Earth, Wind & Fire‘s Holiday (iTunes) and Pentatonix‘s That’s Christmas To Me (iTunes).
  • Other releases out this week include: Andrea Bocelli‘s Opera, The Ultimate Collection (iTunes), Annie Lennox‘s Nostalgia (iTunes), Aretha Franklin‘s Sings The Great Diva Classics (iTunes), Billy Idol‘s Kings & Queens Of The Underground (iTunes), Boyz II Men‘s Collide (iTunes), Bush‘s Man On The Run (iTunes), Gavin DeGraw‘s Finest Hour: The Best Of Gavin DeGraw (iTunes), Jacquie Lee‘s Broken Ones (EP) (iTunes), Jerry Garcia‘s GarciaLive Volume 5: December 31st 1975, Keystone Berkeley (iTunes), Jessie Ware‘s Tough Love (iTunes), Kiesza‘s Sound Of A Woman (iTunes), Neil Diamond‘s Melody Road (iTunes), Primus‘s Primus & The Chocolate Factory with the Fungi Ensemble (iTunes), Susan Boyle‘s Hope (iTunes) and Vérité‘s Echo (EP) (iTunes).

New digital-only singles that you can buy this week include:

  • “Baby Don’t Lie”, the new single from singer Gwen Stefani. (iTunes)
  • “Lips Are Movin”, a movin’ musical moment from Meghan Trainor. (iTunes)
  • “Nobody”, a single from YouTube’s Ricky Dillon. (iTunes)
  • “Outside”, a collaboration from Calvin Harris and Ellie Goulding. (iTunes)
  • “Welcome To New York”, a digital single from Taylor Swift. (iTunes)

A country chanteuse turned pop princess has a pretty huge album coming out on Monday… gee, I wonder who it could be? That swiftly approaching record, along with the rest of the new releases, are coming up in a full preview on Sunday night.

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FRIDAY FORTY: Just A Fool Or Forty

Happy Friday! Welcome to another special edition of an occasional segment I’m putting together called The Friday Forty. Consider it a definitive list on all sorts of music-related topics (and much better than those VH1 lists!)

It’s still a few days before you have to put your April Fool’s Day pranks into action, so make it a good one this year. I’m sure you’ll come up with something extra special. In the meantime, there’s been some foolish behavior on the music charts for years, from dancing fools to fools in the rain. We’ve kissed them and believed them. We’ve even questioned ourselves about being the fool. Everybody plays the fool, and we played these records a lot, even if they didn’t peak around the Day. (Some of them indeed did.) So, instead of my yapping and fooling around, I present to you the Friday Forty: The Top 40 Fools of the Rock Era.

(I’m still figuring out the best way to compile these lists. In this case, songs are ranked by peak from the Hot 100 (1958-1973) or the CHR airplay chart (1974-present.) Ties in peak are broken up by year-end positions on the respective survey. Enjoy!)

40. The Impressions – Fool For You (#22, 1968)
39. James Ray – If You Gotta Make A Fool Of Somebody (#22, 1961)
38. Lulu – Oh Me, Oh My (I’m A Fool For You Baby) (#22, 1970)
37. Styx – Fooling Yourself (The Angry Young Man) (#21, 1978)
36. The Rolling Stones – Fool To Cry (#19, 1976)
35. Frankie Valli – I Make A Fool Of Myself (#18, 1967)
34. Eddie Money – Maybe I’m A Fool (#18, 1979)
33. Dino, Desi and Billy – I’m A Fool (#17, 1965)
32. Sammy Davis, Jr. – What Kind Of Fool Am I (#17, 1962)
31. Wilson Pickett – Don’t Let The Green Grass Fool You (#17, 1971)

30. Larsen-Feiten Band – Who’ll Be The Fool Tonight (#16, 1980)
29. Quarterflash – Find Another Fool (#16, 1982)
28. The Who – Won’t Get Fooled Again (#15, 1971)
27. Foghat – Third Time Lucky (First Time I Was A Fool) (#14, 1980)
26. Andy Williams – A Fool Never Learns (#13, 1964)
25. Luther Vandross – Don’t Want To Be A Fool (#12, 1991)
24. Rick Nelson – Fools Rush In (#12, 1963)
23. Steve Perry – Foolish Heart (#10, 1985)
22. The Tams – What Kind Of Fool (Do You Think I Am?) (#9, 1963)
21. Aaron Neville – Everybody Plays The Fool (#9, 1991)

20. Chris Rea – Fool (If You Think It’s Over) (#9, 1978)
19. Rick Springfield – What Kind Of Fool Am I? (#9, 1982)
18. Barbra Streisand & Barry Gibb – What Kind Of Fool (#7, 1981)
17. Diana Ross – Why Do Fools Fall In Love? (#7, 1981)
16. Sergio Mendes and Brasil ’66 – The Fool On The Hill (#6, 1968)
15. George Michael – Kissing A Fool (#6, 1988)
14. Kenny Loggins – Nobody’s Fool (#6, 1988)
13. Lesley Gore – She’s A Fool (#5, 1963)
12. The Shirelles – Foolish Little Girl (#3, 1963)
11. Brenda Lee – Fool #1 (#3, 1961)

The top ten:
10. The Main Ingredient – “Everybody Plays The Fool”
PEAK: #3, 1972

9. Elvin Bishop – “Fooled Around And Fell in Love”
PEAK: #3, 1976

8. Elvis Presley – “A Fool Such As I”
PEAK: #2, 1959

7. Aretha Franklin – “Chain Of Fools”
PEAK: #2, 1968

6. Ashanti – “Foolish”
PEAK: #2, 2002

Not just a "Little" hit.

Not just a “Little” hit.

5. RICKY NELSON – “Poor Little Fool”
PEAK: #1 in 1958

Teen idol Ricky Nelson blew up at an early age, starring on the 50’s sitcom The Adventures of Ozzie and Harriet along with the rest of his family. In 1957, Nelson began his recording career with a #1 album, Ricky, and a #2 single, “A Teenager’s Romance”. “Poor” was issued in the spring of 1958 and went to #1 for two weeks in August. It holds the distinction of being the first #1 song on the then newly introduced Billboard Hot 100 chart. Nelson had a number of big singles into the early 60’s, but by the middle of the decade, his success experienced a sharp cutoff. “Garden Party” became his final top-40 hit in 1972, peaking at #6, his biggest single in nearly a decade. He had 35 top-40 hits total. Nelson died in a plane crash on New Year’s Eve, 1985.

"Somebody" familiar to the top ten.

“Somebody” familiar to the top ten.

4. CONNIE FRANCIS – “Everybody’s Somebody’s Fool”
PEAK: #1 in 1960

She was on the last Friday Forty about fashion-themed hits, and now, Connie Francis is back again. Like Nelson at #5, Francis also hit the charts for the first time in 1957 with the #4 “Who’s Sorry Now?” but her track record was a little more inconsistent. “Everybody’s Somebody’s Fool” was originally the b-side of another single, “Jealous Of You”, which only went to #19. However, in this rare case, the song that was demoted to a b-side actually went to the top spot, spending two weeks there. Francis followed it up with “My Heart Has A Mind Of Its Own”, which also went to #1. She last hit the top 40 in 1964, but she occasionally made the Hot 100 until the end of the decade. Francis is now 74 years old and sometimes performs.

Couldn't quite "Beat" the top two.

Couldn’t quite “Beat” the top two.

3. DEBBIE GIBSON – “Foolish Beat”
PEAK: #1 in 1988

New Yorker Debbie Gibson wanted to make it big very young, performing in community theater and playing multiple instruments. In 1987, Atlantic Records signed her, and her debut album Out Of The Blue became a multi-Platinum success. This fourth single from the effort became the only #1 hit from it, and, at the tender age of 17, made her the youngest act to write, produce and perform a chart-topping single. Electric Youth, released in 1989, went to #1 on the Billboard 200 album chart on the strength of “Lost In Your Eyes”, but her sales slowly diminished at this point. Gibson last cracked the national charts in 1993, though she’s made some genre-specific surveys since then. She still performs today; in fact, I’ll be seeing her on April 12 at a local event here.

For your chart, your intuition...

“Games” people play.

2. JEWEL – “Foolish Games”
PEAK: #1 in 1997

After two big singles from her Pieces Of You album, this dark track from the Batman & Robin soundtrack was one of two from it to make the mainstream radio chart. (The other was the mid-charter “Gotham City” by R. Kelly.) “Foolish Games” spent four weeks at #1 in the fall, the most out of any song on the list. Jewel scored hits for a number of years afterwards, including 1998’s “Hands” and 2003’s “Intuition”, and also leaped into the world of Country music. Still, her days of big national hits are behind her. She recently put out a Greatest Hits album and a new song from it, “Two Hearts Breaking”, is receiving some minor airplay at the adult contemporary format. She’ll be on tour through the late spring and early summer.

You better "Believe" it.

You better “Believe” it.

1. THE DOOBIE BROTHERS – “What A Fool Believes”
PEAK: #1 in 1979

Now, the most foolish of the fools at #1 on the countdown. After lead singer Tom Johnston fell ill in 1975, The Doobie Brothers took on a different sound with new leader Michael McDonald. “What A Fool Believes” was the first single from Minute By Minute and was a huge and unexpected hit, spending three weeks at #1 on the airplay chart (including over April Fool’s Day) in the spring of 1979. (It only spent one week atop the Hot 100.) The group had a handful of other charting singles, then disbanded in 1982, until they reunited in 1987. They managed to take one more single into the top 40, 1989’s “The Doctor”, though McDonald had left the band at that point. The group still tours today with different lineups and Johnston reinstated as lead singer.

Thanks for logging on and checking out another of the Friday Forty posts and if you have any suggestions for themes or a favorite song on the list, let me know! Post away in the comments or find on Twitter: @AdamFSoybel.

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The Trouble With “Trouble”: A Swift Ascent To The Top

A girl in "Trouble" is a temporary thing.

A girl in “Trouble” is a temporary thing.

This week, Taylor Swift takes a two-notch climb to #2 on the Billboard Hot 100 with yet another winner of a hit, “I Knew You Were Trouble”. It’s off her latest disc, Red, which has sold close to 3 million copies in the States in just the three or so months it’s been out. However, if you thought she was the only one to cause a little chaos at the top of the charts, then take a seat on the “cold hard ground” and tune yourself to five other “Trouble” smashes that broke into the top ten on the Hot 100, one of which was a huge #1 song.

THE FORTUNES – “You’ve Got Your Troubles” (1965)
In the heat of the British Invasion of the 1960’s, one of the bands to follow the mighty Beatles was this band from Birmingham, England. It was their biggest hit to date in the U.S., peaking at #7, though it hit the #2 spot in the United Kingdom. Other than that, the group was rather unfortunate in the States with several low charters until a surprise top-20 hit in July 1971, “Here Comes That Rainy Day Feeling Again”. The group never charted that strongly again.

SIMON & GARFUNKEL – “Bridge Over Troubled Water” (1970)
It’s a classic and one of my favorite songs of all-time, but exclusively this version of it. Written during a period of conflict within the duo, this beautiful ballad stormed the Hot 100 and spent six consecutive weeks at #1, ensuring its status as the #1 song of the year and the #2 song of the decade (only beat by Debby Boone‘s “You Light Up My Life”.) It’s by far the biggest “Trouble” single to make it onto the charts, though we’ll see if Swift can top it. The duo had a handful of top-40 hits after this and both had solo material that did well, particularly Paul Simon‘s early to mid-70’s catalogue.

ARETHA FRANKLIN – “Bridge Over Troubled Water” (1971)
Almost a year after the Simon & Garfunkel version had left the charts, the Queen Of Soul, Aretha Franklin, took her R&B rendition of the song to #6 on the Hot 100, her first top ten hit at the time in nearly three years. This version was also heard on the television show Glee, with actress Amber Riley providing the lead vocal. Linda Clifford took her discofied version of the song to #41 on the Hot 100 in 1979. It was also the original a-side to Clay Aiken‘s first post-American Idol single, but was listed on the charts under the b-side’s title, “This Is The Night”, for most of its run because it received more airplay.

MARVIN GAYE – “Trouble Man” (1972/3)
From the soundtrack to the film of the same name, this became another hit for Gaye, peaking at #7 on the Hot 100 in early 1973. It also hit the top 5 on the R&B chart. Rapped T.I. recently released an album that was titled Trouble Man: Heavy Is The Head, partially inspired by the song. Gaye caused some major trouble on the charts for the next ten years with songs like “Let’s Get It On” (1973) and “Got To Give It Up” (1977) until his untimely death in 1984.

LINDSEY BUCKINGHAM – “Trouble” (1981/2)
During a break from Fleetwood Mac in the early 80’s, both Buckingham and Stevie Nicks recorded solo projects. Though the solo LP from Nicks, Bella Dolla, was more successful, Buckingham also managed to score a top ten song of his album, Law And Order. It peaked at #9 in January 1982, just before Billboard changed chart policies, which sent it flying downward as it soon as it exited the top 40 in early February. Buckingham continued with the Mac for a few more albums and had one additional solo top-40 hit in 1984, “Go Insane”.

A number of other “Trouble” titles have cracked the Hot 100 over the years, the first of which was “Trouble In Paradise” by vocal group The Crests. It hit #20 in 1960. Some of my favorites include “A Girl In Trouble (Is A Temporary Thing)” by Romeo Void (1984), “Trouble Me” by 10,000 Maniacs (1989) and “Trouble” by Pink (2003), plus two songs that have only made the CHR chart: “The Trouble With Love Is” by Kelly Clarkson (2004) and “Troublemaker” by Olly Murs, which was may just see topping the Hot 100 in 2013. Stay tuned, and stay out of trouble, okay?

Have another favorite “Trouble” song? Let me know in the comments or on Twitter: @AdamFSoybel.

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