Everything’s Coming Up “Roses”: Flower Power In The Top Ten

Florists with a chorus.

Florists with a chorus.

The smell of sweet success on the pop radio survey smells a lot like “Roses”, and that is also the name of the current single by a DJ duo who call themselves The Chainsmokers and a singer who goes by ROZES. Currently in the top ten on the building chart, a pretty big achievement in itself, the single recently surpassed the peak of the duo’s “#Selfie”, a defining novelty hit from 2014. So, if you haven’t done so already, feel free to take them off the “one-hit wonder” list, but don’t rule out a “two-hit wonder” yet. We’ll see just how high the song goes in the new year. Of course, this isn’t the first “Rose” title to go this far at the CHR/Pop format.

Now, many “Rose” song titles pre-date the beginning of the Radio & Records airplay chart from the fall of 1973. In 1942 alone, six “rose” titles hit the top ten on Billboard’s sales chart, and another four ranked there in 1949. Needless to say, we can’t cover every single one, or you’d be reading this post for a while. In just the 15 or so years before R&R existed, we had these:

“Paper Roses”, Anita Bryant (#5, 1960)
“San Antonio Rose”, Floyd Cramer (#8, 1961)
“Roses Are Red (My Love)”, Bobby Vinton (#1, 1962)
“Ramblin’ Rose”, Nat “King” Cole (#2, 1962)
“Sally, Go ‘Round The Roses”, The Jaynetts (#2, 1963)
“18 Yellow Roses”, Bobby Darin (#10, 1963)
“Red Roses For A Blue Lady”, Vic Dana (#10, 1965)
“(I Never Promised You A) Rose Garden”, Lynn Anderson (#3, 1971)
“Say, Has Anybody Seen My Sweet Gypsy Rose?”, Tony Orlando and Dawn (#3, 1973)
“Stop And Smell The Roses”, Mac Davis (#9, 1974)** (reached #15 on R&R)

There’s definitely a few classics in there. As far as the CHR/Pop radio archives are concerned, here are the tracks that “Roses” is a step away (#11 rolling chart, to date) from joining in the bouquet of beats of the R&R/Mediabase 24/7 era:

“Paper Roses”, Marie Osmond (#5, 1973)
Osmond’s remake of Bryant’s 1960 hit became her biggest solo entry on the pop survey, reaching #5. However, she did hit the top of the country survey three times in 1985 and 1986, two of those being duets. Her newest effort is due to be released on March 25.

“The Rose”, Bette Midler (#1 for one week, 1980)
Midler’s song missed the top of the Hot 100, but it did reach the summit of the pop radio chart, making it one of five songs from a film to make it to #1 in 1980. Midler would return to the top ten in 1989 with “Wind Beneath My Wings” from the movie Beaches.

“Every Rose Has Its Thorn”, Poison (#1 for two weeks, 1988)
Released as the third single from Open Up and Say… Ahh!, this ballad became hugely successful after the modest run of their last single, “Fallen Angel”. They last hit the pop radio list in 1993 with “Stand”. Leader Bret Michaels continues to perform solo today.

“Bed Of Roses”, Bon Jovi (#4, 1993)
After the title track from Keep The Faith barely missed the top ten in late 1992, this powerful ballad quickly found itself there and in the top five by late February. It’s also one of their longest singles to date; its radio edit runs about four minutes and 45 seconds.

“Kiss From A Rose”, Seal (#1 for eight weeks, 1995)
What a career single this was, a song that didn’t perform well overseas when it was initially released the year prior. Then, Batman Forever helped it fly to the top of the charts around the globe. The British performer’s latest album, 7, came out a few weeks ago.

“Roses”, Outkast (#5, 2004)
Though it landed a few spots away from the #1 heights of “Hey Ya!” and “The Way You Move”, the third release to be issued from Speakerboxxx/The Love Below still did some damage on several radio formats. It remains their last single to chart here as a duo.

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